fotojournalismus:

Africa’s mineral wealth and abundant natural resources are no secret. What we also know of much of these commodities is that, in many African countries, the profits yielded from the industries established with the purpose of securing the wealth and inheritance of the citizens of these nations, more often than not, end up in the hands of greedy politicians, easily bribed leaders, and in the pockets of the mostly foreign multinational CEOs and the companies they work for.

For decades, this has been the narrative of a dire situation that only seems to be worsening, and having equally devastating effects in both the lives of those who live in these areas, and the environment surrounding them.

Nigerian photographer, George Osodi, who comes from Nigeria’s oil rich southeastern Niger Delta region, has seen firsthand just how disastrous and traumatic the exploitation of these communities and the natural resources in these regions they occupy can be. These images show two specific areas where these distressing conditions have become the norm - in Nigeria’s Niger Delta region, and in an illegal gold mine in Ghana

Photos by George Osodi

(via dynamicafrica)

fleurdulys: The Blue Room - Paul Ranson
1891

fleurdulysThe Blue Room - Paul Ranson

1891

(via lunenymph)

kateoplis:

Horse training for the militia, Mongolia, 1979, by Eve Arnold (1912-2012)

kateoplis:

Horse training for the militia, Mongolia, 1979, by Eve Arnold (1912-2012)

(via cedarsmoke)

They stay in my mind, these beautiful people,
or anyway beautiful people to me, of which
there are so many. You, and you, and you,
whom I had the fortune to meet, or maybe
missed. Love, love, love, it was the
core of my life, from which, of course, comes
the word for the heart. And, oh, have I mentioned
that some of them were men and some were women
and some — now carry my revelation with you —
were trees. Or places. Or music flying above
the names of their makers. Or clouds, or the sun
which was the first, and the best, the most
loyal for certain, who looked so faithfully into
my eyes, every morning. So I imagine
such love of the world — its fervency, its shining, its
innocence and hunger to give of itself — I imagine
this is how it began.

supersonicartJoanne Nam.

Recent work by the incredible Joanne Nam.

fatalwetdream: _ by by_heima on Flickr.

fatalwetdream_ by by_heima on Flickr.

(via censorus)

likeafieldmouseDavid Altmejd - The Center (2008)

likeafieldmouse:

Victoria Lin

1. Self-portrait

2. He Did Not Know He Was Dead, Then

3. Wine and Sulfur 

inneroptics: Dora Maar

inneroptics: Dora Maar

(via ghost-lilies)

ozu-teapot:

Letter From An Unknown Woman - Max Ophüls - 1948

Joan Fontaine

(via ghost-lilies)

littlelimpstiff14u2:

 The Ghostly Sculptures of Bruno Walpoth

Ghostly sculptures of Bruno Walpoth. Life-size, his powdered beauties, as if in opposition to their ghostly stature, seem heavy and grounded, their gazes locking whomever sees them into a spiritual arrest.

Working with traditional sculptural methods, Walpoth’s work is almost alchemical in quality.  Muscles, eyes and fingers that have been carved into wood (lime and walnut) or covered with lead leaf foils, seem soft and supple, sad and pensive. Idealistically beautiful, his figures show signs of bones and sinew under fragile skin.

Marks from carving tools show on the surface of the wooden bodies, and serve as quiet reminders that these creatures are not human. The marks break what anthropomorphizing has taken place and the observer is introduced to (or reminded of) the artist.  In a strange way, that break makes these works even more fascinating; they make clearly visible the love that has been passed from the creator to the created.

“Contrary to Geppetto, who constructed himself a child (Pinocchio) out of a piece of wood to banish his loneliness, Bruno Walpoth attempts, perhaps out of awareness of life’s transience, to immortalize the volatile spark of youthfulness he catches in the eyes of his models – sometimes his own children – into a wooden sculpture,” writes Absolute Art Gallery‘s Diana Gadaldi.  Walpoth’s figures are also reminiscent of the children in the paintings of Dino Valls and Gottfried Helnwein, yet are not so tortured nor forced into adulthood.  They are more ghostly, or perhaps more Buddhist, as if silently accepting of a new maturity.  Ms. Gadaldi also states that “[they] seem to be immersed in a moment of intimate meditation. Their detached attitude and dreamy expression are characteristic for the stage of life they are going through: one of slow but inexorable physical and psychological development. As they evolve from children to adolescents and from adolescents to young adults, the first traces of self-consciousness and emotional involvement appear on their often still infantile faces.”

http://www.walpoth.com/wood.html

http://www.modernism.ro/2012/02/19/ghostly-sculptures-of-bruno-walpoth/

(via cicadacicada)

therumpus: The Rumblr’s in-house astrologer, Madame Clairevoyant, presents her latest dispatch from the stars:
Cancer: This week, your days might feel too short, your shoes might feel too tight, your house might feel too small. Everything’s going to be okay, but things might feel weird. Everything’s going to be okay, so focus on the moments of small sweetness, each kind word, each sunrise, each song, each meal. Focus on living in small good ways. This week might not be fire and magic, but it can be good; it can keep you warm. Stay up late and think about flowers that bloom at night, all bright and brave.
Today’s image was made specially for Madame Clairevoyant by Jen May.

therumpusThe Rumblr’s in-house astrologer, Madame Clairevoyant, presents her latest dispatch from the stars:

Cancer: This week, your days might feel too short, your shoes might feel too tight, your house might feel too small. Everything’s going to be okay, but things might feel weird. Everything’s going to be okay, so focus on the moments of small sweetness, each kind word, each sunrise, each song, each meal. Focus on living in small good ways. This week might not be fire and magic, but it can be good; it can keep you warm. Stay up late and think about flowers that bloom at night, all bright and brave.

Today’s image was made specially for Madame Clairevoyant by Jen May.

siebentekontinent:

A torinói ló (Béla Tarr, 2011)

(Source: speakingparts, via nadjasveir)